The Evolution of Wastewater Management

It’s estimated that the first sewers of ancient Rome were built between 800 and 735 BC. Slow to evolve, drainage systems began primarily as a means to drain marshes and storm runoff. In fact, sewage systems really didn’t take off until the arrival of the Cloaca Maxima — an open channel that was later covered and is considered today as one of the best-known sanitation artifacts of the ancient world. 

 

Over time, the Romans expanded the network of sewers that ran through the city and linked most of them to the Cloaca Maxima, which emptied into the Tiber River. In 33 BC, under Emperor Augustus’ ruling, the Cloaca Maxima was enclosed, creating a large tunnel.

 

Two thousand years and not much has changed in the management of wastewater!

 

Although we now use pumps to regulate flow and pipes now replace most stone covered waterways, we still use terracotta tile and some old brick tunnels in older cities.

 

One of the biggest changes we’ve witnessed in wastewater management came with the enactment of the Clean Water Act. Now, rather than emptying raw sewage into a river, the Clean Water Act requires sewage be treated and meet high standards before being discharged.

 

Gravity still works!

 

Aside from these new additions to wastewater management systems, sewage still flows to some lower point to be collected. These lower points are known as wet wells.

 

Today, wet wells with pumps installed are used as “lift stations.” Lift stations are designed to turn on a pump when a certain level of sewage is collected. The pump then transfers the sewage to a treatment plant or to another lift station to be collected and transferred again, ending at a treatment plant.

 

As wet wells are filled by anything that is forced into the sewer line, they are notorious for collecting all sorts of debris including rags, diapers, plastic bottles, cans, grease, oil, dead animals and even clothing — all of which need to be physically removed and hauled away. These materials frequently clog pumps, which means maintenance personnel get the smelly job of removing the debris, cleaning the pump and then replacing it time and time again.

 

What if there was a lift station that:

  • Automatically follows any variations in flow
  • Automatically adjusts its head pressure to the variable flows
  • Accepts entrained air up to ten percent without cavitation
  • Handles dry running
  • Eliminates gases and odors
  • Does not accumulate sand or grease
  • Does not require screens, rakes or regular cleaning of debris
  • Does not clog
  • Is self-cleaning
  • Reduces energy costs
  • Costs less to install and maintain
  • Is remotely serviced and programmed
  • Eliminates the need for wet wells altogether

 

Well, there is and it’s here now! It is called the DIP System®!

 

What is the DIP System®?

 

DIRECT IN-LINE PUMP SYSTEM — AN INNOVATIVE PRINCIPLE

 

By lifting gravity effluent directly at the point of entry, without water loading or a wet well, the DIP Systeme® overcomes the drawbacks of retained volumes of effluent.
By lifting gravity effluent directly at the point of entry, without water loading or a wet well, the DIP Systeme® overcomes the drawbacks of retained volumes of effluent.

 

By lifting gravity effluent flow directly at the point of entry, without water loading or a wet well, the DIP System® overcomes the drawbacks of retained wet well volumes of effluent as there are:

  • No dangerous gases (H₂S)
  • No odors
  • No sand and grease accumulation
  • No equipment corrosion
  • No structural erosion
  • No clogged float switches
  • No trash or debris collection

 

Visit cbeuptime.com to learn more.

 

By educating our customers about the machinery they rely on for their day-to-day operations, C&B Equipment can help increase uptime, while decreasing the need for costly off-site repairs. That’s what we call Uptime Solutioneering™.

 


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